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THE ROLE OF MOBILE IN ESPORTS

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REPORT: THE STATE AND FUTURE OF MOBILE ESPORTS IN ASIA AND THE WEST
Feb 8, 2018

While mobile has quickly grown as the biggest gaming screen worldwide, its esports scene is largely lagging behind that of PC and console. We collected insights into the state of mobile esports in Asia and the West in this free report.

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Over the past two years, the global esports market grew by 102% to reach $655 million in 2017. While mobile has quickly grown as the biggest gaming screen worldwide, its esports scene is largely lagging that of PC and console. In Asia, however, mobile esports is experiencing a boom, accelerated by the mobile-first culture of the region. The phenomenon is especially outstanding in China, leading with top franchises such as Tencent’s Honor of Kings and Giant Network’s Battle of Balls. In Asia, mobile esports is expected to follow a similar structure to that of PC, with the top games being played and scalable stadium events taking place with large viewership. In the West, PC is still the dominant form of gaming entertainment and is expected to remain so for the coming years. Here, mobile esports is expected to be more successful in other layers of esports, such as the amateur scene.

Using data from our esports solutions, including our Global Esports Market Report, we examine the role of mobile in esports, the top performing titles, trends, and the differences between Asia and the West.

THE STATE & FUTURE OF MOBILE ESPORTS
Report Outline:

Games and Esports Market Overview
PC Esports vs. Mobile Esports
Mobile Esports in the West feat. Case Study on Clash of Clans
Mobile Esports in Asia feat. Case Study on Battle of the Balls
What is the Future Outlook feat. India

This is why economists are increasingly studying sports

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If you look closely at your favourite sport nowadays, it’s hard to miss the influence of economics. It’s evident from the way players are drafted or how much they are paid, through to individual coaching decisions, and even strategic shifts across entire leagues.

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Economists are looking at sport and game theory to help solve fundamental economic questions.
Image: REUTERS/Ricardo Moraes
This has been particularly driven by the rise of game theory in economics. Game theory uses mathematical models to figure out optimal strategies, such as what pitches a baseball pitcher should throw, or whether American Football teams should pass more.

Sport lends itself to economics and game theory because players, coaches and agents act similar to the hypothetical rational decision-makers in economic models.

The economics of professional sport

If you’ve seen or read Moneyball you’ll understand how economics can be used to put together a team. This is the true story of Billy Beane, the former general manager of the Oakland Athletics baseball team. Beane became famous for using economic ideas to identify undervalued players.

Baseball scouts and agents often focused too much on unimportant factors like how hard someone could hit a ball. Using advanced statistics Billy Beane could identify players who were undervalued by his competitors, and play them in ways that made best use of their strengths.
In basketball, Robert D. Tollison is largely behind the explosion of three point shooting in the National Basketball Association. Tollison’s research identified that even though three pointers are less accurate than other shots, over the course of a game and season it makes sense to take more three pointers.

In some cases economists have been hired to solve specific problems. For instance the AFL was worried about clubs “tanking” (purposefully losing) to get favourable draft picks (not mentioning any names, Melbourne).

So the AFL asked Melbourne University Economics Professor Jeff Borland to come up with an objective measure of club performance (based on team performance, win-loss ratios, previous finals appearances and injuries).

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